Port a Google Voice Phone Number to Verizon

I’ve used Google Voice for my primary phone number[1] for several years (first on an Android device, most recently on my iPhone), mainly due to the ability to easily send text messages from my computer as well as view call history from many places.

Google VoiceWith the various phone and SMS enhancements added by Apple as part of iOS 8 and OS X Yosemite, I decided it was time to switch phone software platforms.

Here’s how to port a Google Voice number to Verizon, assuming you are ready to go[2]:

  1. Go to this Google Voice page to unlock your Google Voice number. There’s a $3 fee to unlock the number[3].
  2. Call Verizon at 800–922–0204.
  3. Choose the option for tech support.
  4. Choose the option for number porting, and that you’re porting to Verizon.
  5. When you speak to an agent, tell them you’d like to port a Google Voice number to Verizon, replacing your existing number. The support rep I spoke with seemed to understand exactly what I wanted to do.
  6. They’ll need your Google Voice number. They will ask if there’s a PIN or password on the number. You do not need to tell Verizon you Google password. Just tell them there’s no PIN or password.
  7. You’ll be informed that it takes between two and ten business days for the transfer, and what to expect when the transfer is completed.
  8. Wait. I started the process on a Saturday, and it was a week from the next Monday (total of 9 calendar days and 6 business days) when the number change happened.
  9. After the number changes, you’ll get a message from FaceTime/Messages indicating that there’s a new phone number using your AppleID. That’s your cue that the port is complete.
  10. You’ll need to power off and then turn on your iPhone, then wait a couple minutes, at which point if you go into the Settings app, then Phone, you should see the device now using the number that was formerly your Google Voice number.

At that point, you’ll be all set to use the iPhone’s native telephone/messaging features, along with the companion features that are part of OS X. If you’re using an iPhone, all of your iPhoney friends will notice you’ve switched from being a green bubble person to a blue bubble person.

Don’t forget to set up your Verizon voicemail!


  1. Nobody had my Verizon number.  ↩

  2. Are you using your current Verizon number for anything such as SMS 2-factor auth codes? If so, be sure to disable these since your current Verizon number will go away.  ↩

  3. If you previously ported this number in to Google Voice, the unlock fee is waived.  ↩

How I Read on the Internet

Yesterday Eddie Smith wrote that Read Later is dead and I figured now would be a fantastic time to post some related thoughts about how I read on the internet[1].

Incoming: RSS, Twitter, Chat, etc

Online information comes from various sources. I subscribe to hundreds of feeds in NewsBlur. I follow a bunch of people on various social media platforms. Friends send me links via email or IM or Slack or other private messages.

If the item is short and I have a moment, I read it then… it’s like a reading adaptation of the 2-minute “Process it now” mantra from Getting Things Done. I read pretty quickly, so I can read many (most) things I come across on the spot.

Reading Later

If not, it gets sent to Instapaper. I have a recurring weekly task in OmniFocus to review my Instapaper queue, but in reality I do it far more often… Instapaper tends to be my bedtime reading.

After Reading

Once I’ve read something:

  • If it was rather unremarkable it’ll simply get archived in Instapaper.
  • If I found it interesting, I’ll save it to Pinboard for reference.
  • I might also choose to share it out to Twitter.
  • If it leads to a followup task, it gets sent to OmniFocus.

By deferring any sort of longish reading to Instapaper, I can rapidly move through incoming streams, then shift into reading mode later.


  1. This is how I read. It probably isn’t how you read. If you read in some other way and it works for you, that’s fantastic. I’m okay with that.  ↩